“House on Rodeo Gulch” – (Movie Review)

By Andrew Buckner

Rating: ***1/2 out of *****.

Enjoyable performances enhance an already engaging mystery in writer-director William Scherer’s debut, House on Rodeo Gulch (2017). This central secret involves the strange goings-on in a home located in Santa Cruz, California. Such occurs after Denise Peterson (Chanel Ryan), and her strong-willed step-daughter, Shani (Megan Jay Simrell), take residence in the household. Soon afterward, the duo uncover that the building has attracted the attention of their neighbors. They are an obsessive Reverend, James (Jaye Wolfe), and his alcoholic assistant, Raul (Adrian Torres).

Based on true events, this plot is a stalwart foundation for a thriller. Scherer’s Hitchcockian inspiration lends a classical, underlying elegance to the fabrication. Continually, the meticulous, slow-burn pace of the excursion beautifully builds upon this basis. The high-functioning presence of this trait is consistently noteworthy throughout the 95-minute production. This is a courtesy of Scherer, who deftly plays Junior, and his well-structured and intelligent scripting. The same can be said of his equally proficient guidance of the affair. These items combine spectacularly. This is to keep both audience devotion and the enigma of the tale ever-palpable. The comedic bits installed into the undertaking, though minimal, further season the exercise. Simultaneously, Scott toys with the potentially supernatural elements of the saga to admirable consequence. This is true in the early sections of the feature. Still, there is a succession of familiar beats unveiled throughout the endeavor. Such a quality keeps the project from becoming groundbreaking. This is most evident in the underwhelming finale.

Regardless, the cinematography from Chen Dubrin, who also crafts a wonderful depiction of George in the picture, is stellar. His former-stated influence offers a gloomy, atmospheric veneer to the chronicle. Such comfortably suits the general feel of the configuration. Likewise, Scherer’s editing is proficient. The make-up, effects, costume design and sound contributions are also solid. Correspondingly, Austin Lawrence and Kevin MacLeod’s music is riveting.

The relationship between Denise and Shani is also a smart focal point for Scherer’s work. These aforesaid protagonists are sufficiently developed. They offer an internal intensity to the piece that makes viewers care. It also heightens the credibility Scherer injects into the proceedings. The other individuals that populate Scherer’s account aren’t as fully formed. Still, the vagueness of these details immeasurably increases the overall mystery coursing throughout the effort.

Such results in a splendidly honed and character-oriented psychological suspense yarn. The philosophical themes Scherer explores are bold. Moreover, the film comes off as authentic in nearly all departments. in turn, the arrangement builds a captivatingly believable tone. Best of all, Scherer culminates shock and surprise from sheer storytelling. Rarely does he resort to cheap jump scares or similar tactics of evoking on-screen fear. Scherer’s latest cinematic venture, which is full of many smoothly engineered narrative shifts, fluently allows bystanders to obtain the perspective of its chief figures. The undergoing just as readily establishes Scherer as an upcoming moviemaker to be watched. Because of these incredible attributes, the unique House on Rodeo Gulch is certainly worthwhile.

(Unrated).

Available on Vimeo and other digital platforms now.

Advertisements

Leave a Reply

Fill in your details below or click an icon to log in:

WordPress.com Logo

You are commenting using your WordPress.com account. Log Out / Change )

Twitter picture

You are commenting using your Twitter account. Log Out / Change )

Facebook photo

You are commenting using your Facebook account. Log Out / Change )

Google+ photo

You are commenting using your Google+ account. Log Out / Change )

Connecting to %s