A Brief Word on New/Upcoming Releases: “Alone”, “The Brainwashing of My Dad”, “Burning Bridges”, “47 Meters Down” and “A Quiet Passion”

By Andrew Buckner

“Alone”

Rating: **** out of *****.

“Alone” (2017), a 2-minute short film from director Tofiq Rzayev, is a smartly bare bones exploration of fear. Specifically, the terror that strikes one man (in an absorbing performance from Mehmet Faith Guven). This is as he begins to sense that he might not be the only one in his home. It is a classic horror story set-up; a scene spied in many cinematic entries in the genre. Yet, Rzayev proves its enduring effectiveness. This is with his atmospheric and nail-biting guidance of the project. The sudden bump-in-the-night trope so commonly associated with stories of this ilk is brilliantly incorporated. This is especially true when considering the wisely wordless attributes of the piece.

When combined with Gergo Elekes’ wonderfully creepy music and Rzayev’s masterful cinematography, the effort is all-around incredible. This Angry Student Films production also operates as a dazzling homage to an impression many have felt at one point or another in their life. Such a relatable trepidation makes this haunting exercise evermore unnerving. Because of these aforementioned qualities, Rzayev’s latest is as hair-raising as it is well-made.

(Unrated).

“Alone” can be seen in its entirety at the YouTube link above.

 

The Brainwashing of My Dad

Rating: ***** out of *****.

Director and co-writer Jen Senko’s The Brainwashing of My Dad (2016) is a beautifully fashioned and essential political documentary. Concerning the effects conservative media has on her once long-standing democrat father, a World War II veteran, the 92-minute project is as powerful as it is timely. Though it can be argued that the Gravitas Ventures distribution release is a bit one-sided at times, the intriguing interviews administered are undeniably affecting. The same can be said of the myriad bits of documented evidence Senko presents to back up her case. Such results in an endeavor that is ever-absorbing.

Furthermore, the overall style of the documentary, which is heavily reminiscent of a Michael Moore venture, is perfectly suited to the material. When combined with Rachel Levine’s solid cinematography and Jeff Formosa’s same said sound contribution, the deft execution of the exertion is dually perceivable. Alongside these attributes, Senko fashions an insightful gem. It is one that is as well-paced and in-depth as it is eye-opening. In turn, The Brainwashing of My Dad endures as an emotionally resonant looking glass into the effects of televised propaganda on American culture. This is a must-see.

(Unrated).

Available now on Blu-ray, DVD and on Amazon prime.

 

Burning Bridges

Rating: ****1/2 out of *****.

Rapper Ernie D’s 6-track, 23-minute EP, Burning Bridges (2017), is insightful, introspective and immersive; a truly inspiring work. The production is fantastic. Additionally, the lyricism is poetic, complex, clever and mesmerizing. It uplifts. This is while being filled with sorrow, pain, wisdom and life lessons. Correspondingly, every song is a standout. This is some of the best material from this artist to date.

(Parental Advisory). Explicit lyrics.

Available now at Amazon and other streaming platforms.

 

47 Meters Down

Rating: ** out of *****.

Aside from stellar cinematography and an enjoyable final twist, there is hardly anything that doesn’t feel standard service in 47 Meters Down (2017): a surprisingly ineffectual shark survival/suspense story. Mandy Moore is charismatic and enjoyable as the lead, Lisa. This is even if her central figure is a one-dimensional archetype. Additionally, Johannes’ Roberts’ direction is competent enough. Still, it does little to keep this forgettable 89-minute project afloat.

(PG-13). Contains violence and adult content.

In theaters now. On Blu-Ray and DVD September 26th, 2017.

 

A Quiet Passion

Rating: ****1/2 out of *****.

Though conventional in structure, writer-director Terence Davies’ biopic of the ever-rebellious Emily Dickinson, A Quiet Passion (2016), effortlessly flows with an unvarnished beauty. This is in nearly all cinematic facets. Such is especially visible in Davies’ admirable handling of mood. Yet, the cinematography, music and philosophical themes explored in the venture are where this exquisite nature is most evident. Still, the crowning achievement of Davies’ exercise are the performances. Most notably, Cynthia Nixon’s masterful, layered and nuanced lead turn.

Dickinson’s timeless and immersive poetry, which is narrated in a manner which is meant to communicate her unspoken thoughts to the audience during the more pensive moments of the labor, only heightens the elegance of the 125-minute project. Furthermore, Davies’ screenplay and overall guidance of the feature, which brings about a hefty Ingmar Bergman-like sensibility to the proceedings, are every bit as mature and refined as the narrative demands. The result of these high-caliber attributes is a mesmerizing masterpiece. Davies has crafted what is undoubtedly one of the best movies of the year.

(PG-13). Contains adult content.

Now available on Blu-ray, DVD and digital platforms.

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