“Clowntergeist” – (Movie Review)

By Andrew Buckner

Rating: **** out of *****.

Incorporating likable characters, performances, credible dialogue and a clever concept, writer-director Aaron Mirtes’ Clowntergeist (2017) is efficient, effective horror. The build-up and overall atmosphere of the eighty-minute venture are both equally outstanding. Mirtes, with constant assistance from Kris Brendrick’s chill-inducing music and Chaz Olivier’s remarkably moody cinematography, induces unyielding fear in cinema patrons. This is perceptible from the unnerving opening sequence. The full-throttle terror Mirtes, who works from a story by Brad Belemjian, implements courses throughout the labor. Yet, audiences care all the while. This is thanks to a screenplay that is as scary as it is protagonist-oriented. Such a debt is also owed to Mirtes’ stylish and nail-biting guidance of the project. The attempt is also graced with a satisfying finale. Such is proceeded by an eye-popping and imaginative concluding credits segment. This passage also makes good use of the blood red balloons which become equated with our antagonist.

The engaging plot concerns a coulrophobic college student, Emma (Brittany Belland). After becoming the recipient of the aforesaid inflatable, which we learn early on in Mirtes’ exercise tells victims the exact date and time the demonic title fiend will attack, Emma is forced to face her worst nightmare. With two days until the unholy fiend, Ribcage the Clown (Eric Corbin), delivers his promised violence upon her, she must find out how to defeat the evil creature. As news surfaces throughout Emma’s home town of the bodies the entity has left in its wake, the anxiety within Emma only rises.

Such is a wonderful platform for a feature of this ilk. It is one which Mirtes injects with the presence of wickedness, whether in the dialogue between the central figures or in physicality, in nearly every scene of the production. The inventive means of terror Mirtes derives from the big top related nature of his villain is just as admirable. Mirtes also utilizes statements at the bottom of the screen. This is to inform viewers of the time left until the murderous beast strikes. Such is a bold decision. It is one which could’ve easily become cloying. In so doing, it might have just as readily pulled bystanders out of the entire episode. This is on each occasion that these countdowns are seen. Yet, it only adds to the deftly executed intensity. Such is another reason why the monster at the center of the tale always feels like he is watching and silently stalking Mirtes’ leads throughout the effort. Given the many haunting sensibilities of the piece, spectators may even have the same impression about their own surroundings.

Additionally, Mirtes’ editing is seamless and sharp. Karina Rivera’s costume design is spectacular. The make-up from Mirtes and Michelle Struve is similarly astonishing. Mirtes’ visual effects are just as triumphant. The sound, camera and lighting fare just as well. Likewise, Monica Baker is exceptional as Emma’s friend, Heather. Mirtes skillfully portrays Uncle Ted.

The result of these high-functioning traits is an incredibly memorable descent into fear. One of the greatest qualities of the exertion is that it doesn’t overdo it on the gore. Still, this restraint does little to dilute the wild and raw impact at hand. It’s a lot like Tobe Hooper’s magnum opus, The Texas Chain Saw Massacre (1974), in that respect. There is also a touch of Stephen King visible in the endeavor. This can be found lurking in the personalities of those who embody Mirtes’ fiction. It is just as noteworthy in the general tone. Mirtes has crafted a real winner. This High Octane Pictures distribution release is fast-paced and captivating. Genre fans will assuredly be delighted.

Clowntergeist will be available on Video on Demand September 12th, 2017.

(Unrated).

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