Capsule Reviews: “All the Money in the World”, “The Devil’s Well”, “Ferdinand”, “The Foreigner” and “Slumber”

By Andrew Buckner

ALL THE MONEY IN THE WORLD

Rating: ****1/2 out of *****.

All the Money in the World is one of the best films of 2017. It is also another masterful exhibition of craft from the always interesting director Ridley Scott. The 132-minute thriller, which chronicles the true- life story of the abduction of 16-year-old John Paul Getty III, is riveting from start to finish. It is so engrossing that I barely stirred during my viewing of the picture. Further benefitting the affair is a performance from Christopher Plummer that is one of the finest to hit movie screens all year. Michelle Williams and Mark Wahlberg, who portray Gail Harris and Fletcher Chase respectively, issue deft, layered and gripping enactments. Additionally, Scott’s engrossing storytelling, confident pacing and distinguished behind the lens style makes this compelling and highly-cinematic work evermore accomplished. This is a must-see!

(R). Contains violence, language and adult themes.

In theaters now.

THE DEVIL’S WELL

Rating: ***1/2 out of *****.

The Devil’s Well (2017) is an always interesting, if routinely structured, faux documentary style horror picture. It is one that gleans its chilling nature in the manner of many of the most enduring installments in the previously stated sub-genre: through the power of the imagination. Whether describing fearful incidents in the past or present, the Kurtis Spieler penned and guided opus often wisely tells instead of directly showcasing its stabs at trepidation. This is excluding the engaging concluding 15 minutes of this 88-minute endeavor. Such a time-honored approach works beautifully. Spieler’s affair is no exception. In telling the simultaneously chilling and entertaining tale of Karla Marks (Anne-Marie Mueschke) and her disappearance into the notorious title place, Spieler crafts both relatable and believable characterizations, same said dialogue, situations and scares into a deft dose of low-budget chills. Recommended!

(Unrated).

On DVD 1/23/18 from Wild Eye Releasing.

FERDINAND

Rating: **** out of *****.

Though formulaic in structure and prone to a few moments that may be thematically too dark for some young children (especially in the finale), the beautifully animated Ferdinand (2017) sports a balance of genuinely funny humor and effective sentiment that is as admirable as it is infectious. Alongside John Cena and Kate McKinnon’s lively lead voice work, the always welcome message of embracing love in a world of violence that courses throughout the film is as timely as it is timeless. In turn, the slightly overlong 108-minute feature, based on Munro Leaf’s classic book about the adventures of a kind-hearted bull who is mistaken for a menace, proves to be both a wonderful surprise and robust family-friendly entertainment.

(PG). Contains some crude moments and situations.

In theaters now.

THE FOREIGNER

Rating: *1/2 out of *****.

The Foreigner (2017) is a murky, dull, by-the-numbers mess of a movie. It fails as both a conspiracy thriller and as an action film. Worst of all, leading man Jackie Chan’s often jaw-dropping capacity for cinematic combat is wasted here. This is due to director Martin Campbell’s insistence on keeping such moments as brief and standard service as possible. This is a problem found throughout the relatively empty 112-minute runtime of the film. Moreover, the finale to this terrorist revenge tale is especially flat and unsatisfying. In turn, Campbell has crafted an all-around desperate, distant and forgettable venture. Skip it.

(R). Contains violence and adult themes.

Now available on digital.

SLUMBER

Rating: **** out of *****.

Slumber (2017) is a lean, well-mounted and genuinely effective sleep paralysis based horror outing. The story, which concerns a sleep doctor’s attempts to defend a family from a demon that torments them while they dream, is first-rate. The same can be said of Maggie Q’s central depiction of Alice Arnolds. Co-writer (with Richard Hobley) and director Jonathan Hopkins provides excellent work with his aforesaid contributions. The last 15 of this 84-minute production, though a shade predictable, are a perfect payoff to the immersive buildup beforehand.

(Unrated). Contains violence and terrifying situations.

Now available on digital and in select theaters.

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